USS Coronado
LCS Crew 203 is Onboard
 
9/23/2014
USS Coronado Performs Live-Fire Test of Norwegian Strike Missile
Target Practice

PACIFIC OCEAN – The crew of the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) successfully performed a live-fire demonstration of a Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM) during missile testing operations off the coast of Southern California, Sept. 23.

During the test, the Norwegian-made Kongsberg NSM was launched from the deck of Coronado and scored a direct hit on its intended target, a Mobile Ship Target (MST).

The Kongsberg NSM is a long range precision strike missile designed to be launched from a variety of ships against a variety of targets.

Testing took place on board the Navy’s newest littoral combat ship to show the LCS’ ability to readily accept new weapons systems as part of the Foreign Comparative Testing (FCT) program.

“We are extremely pleased with the outcome of today’s test on board Coronado,” said Vice Adm. Thomas S. Rowden, Commander, Naval Surface Forces. “We view this successful missile test as a possible future warfighting capability for the LCS program.”

Rowden said the Navy is interested in increasing both quantity of firepower and range across the surface fleet.

“Both classes of the LCS are based on modular design concepts,” said Rowden. “This allows for the integration of weapons and sensors like the Kongsberg NSM technology as part of the LCS warfare suite.”

Since 1980, the FCT program has helped the United States and allies reap substantial savings by avoiding research and development costs, lowering procurement costs, reducing risk for major acquisition programs and accelerating the fielding of equipment critical to the reading and safety of operating forces.

 

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Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM)Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM)Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM)Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM)
(Sept. 23, 2014) - The crew of the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) successfully performed a live-fire demonstration of a Kongsberg Naval Strike Missile (NSM) during missile testing operations off the coast of Southern California, Sept. 23. During the test, the Norwegian-made Kongsberg NSM was launched from the deck of Coronado and scored a direct hit on its intended target, a Mobile Ship Target (MST). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary D. Bell/Released)

Commissioned on April 4, 2014, Coronado was designed to be high-speed, shallow draft multi-mission ship capable of operating independently or with an associated strike group. LCS ships are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in coastal waters.

A fast, maneuverable, and networked surface combatant, LCS provides the required warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions such as surface warfare, mine warfare and anti-submarine warfare.

LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system. Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables the ship to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting rapid technological updates. LCS employs advanced tactical networks to share information with aircraft, ships, submarines, and joint and coalition units both at sea and shore. Surface Warfare Magazine

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