Welcome aboard the U.S. Navy's 19th Arleigh Burke Class Destroyer, USS MILIUS! We are extremely proud of this great warship and her vast accomplishments. Since commissioning on November 23, 1996, her dedicated service has included six deployments and Battle Efficiency Awards in 1998, 2002, and 2013. MILIUS is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. A multi-mission capable ship, MILIUS is designed
to perform anti-air, anti-submarine, surface, and strike warfare simultaneously. She is also a Ballistic Missile Defense platform, capable of providing theater and homeland protection through her ability to detect, track, and engage ballistic missiles.

"Alii Prae Me"
Keel Laid - August 1993
Commissioned - November 23, 1996; Location: Pascagoula, MS
The USS Milius is an ARLEIGH BURKE-class Aegis guided missile destroyer that provides multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities in support of the Nation’s maritime security strategy. MILIUS can operate independently or as part of aircraft carrier strike groups, surface action groups, expeditionary strike groups, and underway replenishment.
Explanation of the Symbolism of Ship's Crest and Shield
 Milius Crest
The ship’s crest is designed in remembrance of the military service of the ship’s namesake, Captain Paul Lloyd Milius, and the courage and dedication that promoted his selfless act of heroism.  
Dark blue and gold are colors traditionally used by the Navy and denote the sea and excellence. The shield itself reflects the power of the Aegis shield. The double-edged battle-ax symbolizes the power of the modern guided missile destroyer. The battle-ax harnesses is a warning that peace should be maintained; provoked and unleashed, the battle-ax is a punishing offensive weapon capable of delivering crushing blows.  The trident reflects the prowess of MILIUS, capable of projecting sea power on the land, in the air, and on and beneath the sea.  The crossed swords are the modern Navy sword of today and the cutlass of the John Paul Jones era symbolizing the enduring tradition and heritage of the United States Navy.  The border, for unity, is red highlighting readiness for action and sacrifice, if necessary.  The seven bolts on the border represent the seven lives saved by Captain Milius’ heroic action. 
The lion suggests Captain Milius’ extraordinary heroism as the aircraft commander in Observation Squadron Sixty-Seven for which he received the Navy Cross, represented by the cross plate, and underscored his selfless courage and inspiring devotion to duty. 
ALii Prae Me, or “Others Before Myself,” was chosen to reflect the personal ethic held throughout Captain Milius’ military career and his selfless act under fire.
Name Sake                                              

 

USS MILIUS is named in honor of Navy Captain Paul Lloyd Milius. Captain Milius' selfless actions over Laos saved the lives of seven Americans during the Vietnam War. Despite all efforts, Captain (then Commander) Milius was never recovered, and on April 26, 1978, he was declared Presumed Killed In Action. He was posthu­ mously promoted to Captain and awarded the Navy Cross.  Born on February 11, 1928, in Denver, Iowa, Paul Milius enlisted in the Navy at age 18 and attended boot camp at Naval Training Center in San Diego, CA. In 1948, he was discharged from active duty and enrolled at Iowa State Teacher's College, now the University of Northern Iowa. Upon graduation, he was accepted into the Naval Aviation Cadet Program, and on December 21, 1951, he received his commission as an Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
Captain Milius married his high school sweetheart, Darlene Meyerhoff on December 30, 1951, and had two children, Annette and David. Annette later became the official sponsor to USS MILIUS, christening the ship on October
28, 1995. 

USS Milius group photo

                                                                           

 Squadron Sixty Seven

The Navy's Observation Squadron Sixty-Seven (V0-67) was a top-secret squadron that existed from February 1967 to July 1968. Their mission was to detect, classify, hinder, and penalize the North Vietnamese Army infiltration into the South using twelve extensively modified P2V-5
Neptune aircraft, called OP-2Es. The squadron was deployed to Nakhon Phanom RoyalThaiAir
Force Base,Thailand, nine miles from the Laotian border.

 

  

 

 

 

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Captain (then Commander) Paul Lloyd Milius, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism on 27 February 1967, as an Aircraft Commander in Observation Squadron Sixty-Seven (V0-67). During a combat mission in Southeast Asia, Captain Milius' aircraft received multiple hits from 37mm anti-aircraft-artillery fire during a run over the assigned target. Immediately, the aircraft burst into flames, several members of the crew received injuries, and dense smoke and fumes filled the fuselage. Remaining at the controls to insure stable flight, Captain Milius ordered his crew members to bail out. As a result of his action, seven of his nine crewmen were rescued within three hours of bail-out. Rescue flights, however, were unable to locate Captain Milius.
His heroic efforts and inspiring devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

 Milius and Ensign
 Mission
USS MILIUS (DDG 69) is an ARLEIGH BURKE-class Aegis guided missile destroyer that provides multi- mission offensive and defensive capabilities in support of the Nation’s maritime security strategy. MILIUS can operate independently or as part of aircraft carrier strike groups, surface action groups, expeditionary strike groups, and underway replenishment groups.
Strike Warfare: Delivering Tomahawk Land Attack Cruise Missiles to targets ashore.
Air Defense: Defending other naval units and costal areas against air and ballistic missile
threats through the use of the Aegis Weapon System, SPY Radar, and Surface to Air
Missiles.

Surface Defense:Defending other naval units against surface vessels threats, both large
warships and small boats, through the use of Harpoon cruise missiles and 5 inch guns.
Submarine Defense: Defending other naval units from enemy submarines through the use of
the hull mounted and towed array sonars, and torpedoes.
Maritime Interception Operations: Querying and boarding vessels on the high sea in the
search for terrorists and contraband.
Forward Presence: Showing the flag and our maritime capability overseas to demonstrate
national interest and resolve.
Ballistic Missile Defense:  MILIUS is capable of providing regional and homeland defense through her ability to detect, track, and engage ballistic missiles. 

 

 

Replenishments at sea (RAS) are vital to keeping MILIUS mission ready while underway. During a RAS, MILIUS steers alongside a supply ship while pallets of everything from food to ammunition are hoisted over. At the same time, MILIUS receives fuel through hoses from the supply ship. The evolution requires extensive planning and all hands' participation.

 

 

MILIUS' Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) team performs a boarding exercise during an Arabian Gulf deployment. The team plays a crucial role in supporting MILIUS' maritime security mission. Using rigid-hulled inflatable boats (RHIB), the team boards and inspects nearby merchant vessels.

                                                      

 

 

The flight deck allows helicopters, like this SH-60S, to land on MILIUS in order to transfer mail, equipment, and people to and from the ship. MILIUS' flight deck is also a valuable asset to helicopter crews looking for a location to refuel or make repairs during long missions.

 Previous Commanding Officers
 

 COMMANDER DAINE E. EISOLD
November 23, 1996 – February 27, 1998

COMMANDER JAMES McMANAMON
February 27, 1998 – October 29, 1999

COMMANDER THOMAS S. ROWDEN
October 29, 1999 – May 11, 2001

COMMANDER JEFFREY A. HARLEY
May 11, 2001 – April 15, 2003

COMMANDER JOHN S. MITCHELL III
April 15, 2003 – May 12, 2005

COMMANDER DAVID J. SHERIDAN
May 12, 2005 – Nov 7, 2006

COMMANDER EDMUND B. HERNANDEZ
Nov 7, 2006 – May 30,  2008

COMMANDER KENDALL GENNICK
MAY 30, 2008 – November 5, 2009

COMMANDER TREVOR KING
November 5, 2009 - April 14, 2011

COMMANDER NICHOLIE BUFKIN
April 14, 2011 - November  1, 2012

COMMANDER STEVE SHEDD
January 11, 2013 - July 2, 2014

COMMANDER MICHAEL RAK
May 2, 2014 - Present

 Official U.S. Navy DDG Fact File

 
US Navy Recruiting | No Fear Act | FOIA | USA.gov | US Navy | US Marine Corps | Navy Reserves | Individual Augmentee | Veterans Crisis Line This is an official United States Navy Website. This US Government system is subject to monitoring. Please read our Privacy Policy and Section 508/Accessibility Statement.

The appearance of external hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the United States Department of Defense, or the United States Department of the Navy of the linked web sites, or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) sites, the United States Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy  does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD web site.