USS Avenger and USS Defender 

USS Avenger (MCM 1) and USS Defender (MCM 2) nest in a modified mooring in preparation for a Hurricane.
Navy to Replace Forward Deployed Mine Countermeasure Ships in Japan 
By Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs 

The U.S. Navy announced today that newer, more capable mine countermeasure ships will forward deploy to Commander, Fleet Activities Sasebo, Japan, to become part of the U.S. Navy's Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF).

The Avenger-class mine countermeasure ships USS Pioneer (MCM 9) and USS Chief (MCM 14) will report to the U.S. 7th Fleet as part of the FDNF in Sasebo in May 2014. They will respectively replace the mine countermeasure ships USS Avenger (MCM 1) and USS Defender (MCM 2), which have both faithfully served in the FDNF since 2009.

Pioneer and Chief collectively represent a significant improvement in capability for the FDNF. Avenger and Defender will both prepare for decommissioning and eventually be heavy-lifted back to their homeport of San Diego in June 2014. Pioneer and Chief are expected to arrive in Sasebo in the May 2014 timeframe.

Avenger is the first of the Navy's Avenger- class of mine countermeasures ships. Built by Peterson Builders Inc., in Sturgeon Bay, Wis., she was christened by Mrs. Sybill Stockdale on June 15, 1985 and placed in active service on Sept. 12, 1987.

Defender is the second Avenger-class mine countermeasures ship and the first United States Navy ship to bear that name. The keel was laid down by Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis., on Dec. 1, 1983. She was christened and launched on April 4, 1987 and commissioned on Sept. 30, 1989.

The two ships will have faithfully served the U.S. Navy for a combined 52 years.

These hull swaps will not necessitate any changes to base facilities in Sasebo or San Diego.

The United States values Japan's contributions to the peace, security and stability of the Indo-Asia-Pacific and its long-term commitment and hospitality in hosting U.S. forces forward deployed there. These forces, along with their counterparts in the Japan Self-Defense Forces, make up the core capabilities needed by the alliance to meet our common strategic objectives.

This hull swap is called an Overseas Force Structure Change and is part of the Navy's long-range FDNF strategy to rotate newer and more capable units forward. Maintaining an FDNF capability supports the United States' commitment to the defense of Japan and the security and stability of the vital Indo-Asia-Pacific.

US Navy Recruiting | No Fear Act | FOIA | USA.gov | US Navy | US Marine Corps | Navy Reserves | Individual Augmentee | Veterans Crisis Line | Vote This is an official United States Navy Website. This US Government system is subject to monitoring. Please read our Privacy Policy and Section 508/Accessibility Statement.

The appearance of external hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the United States Department of Defense, or the United States Department of the Navy of the linked web sites, or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) sites, the United States Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy  does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD web site.

Share