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Commander, Submarine Group Two


 
 

USS Toledo (SSN 769) Returns from Deployment

GROTON, Conn. - Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Toledo (SSN 769) returned to Naval Submarine Base New London on Jan. 20 following a regularly scheduled deployment.
 
The crew, which departed for deployment last summer on July 20, 2010, returned to a snow-covered New England, just in time for some family members.

"I'm excited about handing off the shovel!" joked Tamara Moller, wife of Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Moller, Toledo's Executive Officer.  There was additional excitement for the Mollers during the homecoming. It was their daughter Paige's eighth birthday.  After departing the submarine. Lt. Cmdr. Moller handed his daughter birthday balloons on the pier, while some members of the crowd sang Happy Birthday as they waited for their Sailors to disembark.

Toledo conducted operations in the African Command (AFRICOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility, supporting missions vital to national security interests.  During the deployment, Toledo visited ports in Limassol, Cyprus and Haifa, Israel. 

"It was really incredible. It was gang-busters.  I think it reinforces literally that this is the best job in the world," said Cmdr. Douglas Reckamp, Toledo's commanding officer since March 2009.

"We steamed close to 40,000 miles," continued Reckamp. "It's about putting submarines in places where people don't know where we are.  All the bad guys in the world have to assume that we are near them because nobody knows exactly where we are."

While they were underway, many crew members also worked to advance their naval careers, according to Reckamp.

"From a couple of months before deployment through now, 80 percent of the guys who were eligible to get promoted have been promoted.  Thirty nine guys came back here wearing a higher rank than they were when they were before we deployed.  I had 24 guys decide to extend and reenlist in the Navy while on deployment.  Among all 24 of them, they got $1.5 million in selective re-enlistment bonuses," said Reckamp,

Reckamp, born in Chicago, attended high school in Ocala, Fla. He graduated with distinction from the United States Naval Academy with a degree in Mechanical Engineering.  Upon graduation, Reckamp earned a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering while researching non-linear acoustics at the Applied Research Laboratory of University of Texas in Austin.

Fast-attack submarines like Toledo have multi-faceted missions.  They use their stealth, persistence, agility and firepower to deploy and support special force operations, disrupt and destroy an adversary's military and economic operations at sea, provide early strike from close proximity, and ensure undersea superiority.

The submarine, commissioned Feb. 24, 1995, is the second U.S. warship named for the people of the northwestern Ohio city.  The first was a Baltimore-class heavy cruiser.  Submarine Toledo has a complement of 139 officers and enlisted crew.

- USN -

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GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) Eight year old Matthew Strange pretends to look through binoculars to see the arrival of the USS Toledo (SSN 769). The Los Angeles-class submarine returned to Naval Submarine Base New London following a regularly scheduled deployment.  (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)

GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) A tug boat helps guide Los Angeles-class submarine USS Toledo (SSN 769) up the Thames River to Naval Submarine Base New London following a regularly scheduled deployment.  Toledo conducted operations in the African Command (AFRICOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility, supporting missions vital to national security interests.  (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)

GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) A tug boat helps guide Los Angeles-class submarine USS Toledo (SSN 769) up the Thames River to Naval Submarine Base New London following a regularly scheduled deployment.  Toledo conducted operations in the African Command (AFRICOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility, supporting missions vital to national security interests. (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)

GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) Los Angeles-class submarine USS Toledo (SSN 769) pulls up to the pier at Naval Submarine Base New London following a regularly scheduled deployment.  Toledo conducted operations in the African Command (AFRICOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility, supporting missions vital to national security interests. (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)

GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) The bridge party atop the sail of USS Toledo (SSN 769) observes as the submarine pulls along the pier at Naval Submarine Base New London following a regularly scheduled deployment.  The Los Angeles-class submarine conducted operations in the African Command (AFRICOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility, supporting missions vital to national security interests. (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)

GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) Sailors aboard USS Toledo (SSN 769) set colors after mooring to the pier. The Los Angeles-class submarine returned to Naval Submarine Base New London following a regularly scheduled deployment.   (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)

GROTON, Conn. (January 20, 2011) Chief Yeoman Mark Pitts of USS Toledo (SSN 769) hugs his kids after returning from a regularly scheduled deployment.   The Los Angeles-class submarine conducted operations in the African Command (AFRICOM) and Central Command (CENTCOM) areas of responsibility, supporting missions vital to national security interests.  (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Virginia K. Schaefer.)