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Commander, Submarine Group Two


 
 

120831-N-PN306-023 GROTON, Conn. (Aug. 31, 2012) - Active-duty
and retired Sailors and Navy civilians assigned to Naval Submarine
Support Facility (NSSF) at Naval Submarine Base New London, as
well as their family members, were recognized by the American
Cancer Society for their support of the annual Relay For Life,
Aug. 31. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Cragg/RELEASED)

 

NSSF Sailors Recognized for their Support of American Cancer Society

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) -- Nearly a dozen active-duty and retired Sailors and Navy civilians assigned to Naval Submarine Support Facility (NSSF) at Naval Submarine Base New London were recognized by the American Cancer Society for their support of the annual Relay For Life, Aug. 31.

NSSF Sailors participated in the New London County Shoreline Relay For Life event, which was held at Fitch High School in mid-June.

"This is the second year that Team Naval Submarine Support Facility participated in the Relay For Life," said Pamela Kopp of Regional Support Group.

Kopp added that Team NSSF raised $3,636, which directly supports services to cancer patients. As a team, NSSF walked 116.25 miles, which is equal to walking from New London to Hartford and back. The team received recognition from the American Cancer Society for coming in third place in both the number of laps walked and the fundraising efforts in support of the relay.

"I'm very proud of my active-duty and civilian NSSF team," said NSSF Command Master Chief (SS) Rory Wohlegemuth. "This event clearly shows the NSSF team consisting of active duty, civilian and family members working together for a very important fight."

Kathrine Bradley, American Cancer Society representative for the New London County Shoreline Relay, reflected on Team NSSF's support for cancer patients.

"It is wonderful to work with these great volunteers from the Naval Submarine Support Facility," said Bradley. "They are passionate about the fight against cancer and making a difference in their community."

Legalman 1st Class Danielle Slack and her family also participated in the relay with NSSF to teach her children the lesson of helping others. Slack's nine-year old son took this lesson to heart and single-handedly walked the most laps of anyone at the Relay by completing 26.25 miles.

"I never imagined that Kaden was going to walk that number of laps," said Slack. "We were out there most of the day on Saturday until at least midnight."

Slack said her son was passionate about supporting this relay and encouraged his father to return to the track that next morning by 5 a.m. to finish his 105 laps or 26.25 miles.

"It's a great way to teach my 6 and 9-year old children that there are bad things in the world, but that they can help others, even at such a young age," said Slack, who would like to participate in the relay with both NSSF and with her family again next year.

The following Sailors and Navy civilians who participated in the Relay For Life and were recognized by the American Cancer Society were Machinist's Mate 1st Class (SS) Scott Martin, who served as the team captain and was recognized for his fundraising efforts for the Relay. Other Sailors included Machinist's Mate 1st Class (SS) Stuart Miller, Electronics Technician 1st Class (SS) Dirk Smith; NSSF Command Master Chief (SS) Rory Wohlgemuth; retired Command Master Chief (SS) Mark Mandile, Julie Mandile, Pamela Kopp, Adam Slack, and Ava Slack.