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HELSEACOMBATRON THREE

HELSEACOMBATRON THREE

HELSEACOMBATRON THREE

 SARMM HISTORY

      Since its inception, the Naval service has conducted SAR operations, for its own and for others. Unfortunately, until recently, SAR was conducted in a haphazard fashion and had little to no structure. The costly losses of personnel in two World Wars emphasized the need to preserve personnel and equipment. The introduction of helicopters in the 1940's marked a new chapter in Naval Search and Rescue. The rotary wing aircraft working in conjunction with existing assets, greatly expanded the Navy's SAR capabilities. The quick deployability of the helicopter made SAR missions more viable and permitted SAR missions that previously would have been impossible to conduct. During the Vietnam War the importance of having well trained units with the personnel and equipment to effectively conduct rescue and MEDEVAC operations was realized. Although still not officially regulated, SAR crews began to train and recruit personnel with SAR in mind. Swimmers and Corpsmen were integrated as regular components of SAR aircrews, improving survivor recovery rates and care. The increased number of SAR missions being conducted still had no official structure or standardization. To counter these inadequacies, the Chief of Naval Operations formally established the Search and Rescue Model Manager (SARMM) in 1979. Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Sixteen (HC-16) was the first command to assume duty as SARMM. HC-16 developed numerous advances for Navy SAR including; establishment of CNO approved Rescue Swimmer and SAR Medical Technician curriculums, creation of the SAR TACAID and standardization of level A and & B. medical kits. In 1990 the SARMM responsibility was transferred from HC-16 to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron One (HS-1). Under HS-1's direction, Navy SAR continued to grow and adapt. Their tenure saw the introduction of a safer rappel harness, a major rewrite of the Navy Search and Rescue Manual (NWP 3-50.1), introduction of the SAR/MEDEVAC Litter and surface swimmer Pro-pay/NEC. In March 1997, SARMM duty was again transferred. This time to Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Three (HC-3).  The present staff consists of personnel representing a wide area of expertise in aviation and surface rescue fields. HC-3 has overseen the second major revision to the SAR Manual and the first major revision to OPNAVINST 3130.6 (SAR Instruction).  On April 1st 2005 HC-3 was designated Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron Three (HSC-3).  HSC-3  continues the fine traditions of Navy SAR and the promotion of standardized training, equipment and procedures . . .

So others may live