Electronic Attack Weapons School


 
EAWS Poster 
 

Electronic Attack Weapons School

          The Electronic Attack Weapons School traces its lineage to the original Weapons “Cage” of VA-128, tasked in 1974 to provide refresher and advanced courses for Whidbey Island based A-6 Intruder ordnance personnel. Still a department within VA-128, they evolved into the Medium Attack Weapons School, which then also included Intruder and Prowler aircrew as well as ordnance personnel, training to advanced strike planning, and the handling and loading of over forty types of munitions and stores. June 10, 1986 marked the stand up of the Medium Attack Weapons School Pacific as one of four Navy-wide Functional Wing Weapons Schools. Under the control of the combined functional wing and the sponsorship of the Naval Strike Warfare Center, the School moved into the forefront of naval strike warfare planning.

          With the impending retirement of the A-6 Intruder, on 28 September 1995 Medium Attack Weapons School, Pacific transitioned to the Electronic Combat Weapons School. Established to support 14 fleet squadrons of Electronic Combat Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet, the School emerged as the center of excellence for both Navy and Joint Electronic Attack tactics and weapons loading. In 1997, better reflecting our joint mission, the command name was changed to Electronic Attack Weapons School (EAWS).

          EAWS is the model manager for the Prowler and Growler Weapons and Tactics Programs (PWTP and GWTP), the electronic attack community’s segment of Naval Aviation’s Air Combat Training Continuum, an important initiative designed to dramatically enhance the combat readiness of all Naval air forces. PWTP and GWTP upgrade and standardize all post-Fleet Replacement Squadron training for EA-6B and EA-18G aircrew. Critical to the success of the Weapons Training Programs are the fleet Prowler Tactics Instructors, trained and certified by the Weapons School in semi-annual courses featuring extensive academics, simulators and training flights. Each course culminates in a two-week Mission Employment phase at Nellis AFB, which is also part of the U.S. Air Force Weapons School Weapons Officer Instructor course.

          Aviation Ordnance experts instruct fleet maintenance personnel in weapons loading and handling of various stores, including the AGM-88 High Speed Anti-Radiation Missile (also known as HARM), conducting 57 courses annually for 450 students. The Weapons School experts also conduct Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspections and Technical Assist Visits designed to standardize and certify aircraft ordnance handling procedures.

          Aviation Electronic Technicians are the Conventional Release Systems Test course experts. They instruct Fleet Avionics Technicians in Release and Control (R&C) weapons check procedures for the AGM-88 High Speed Anti-Radiation Missile and the AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile, annually conducting 20 courses for 200 students on the EA-18G Growler. They also conduct Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspections and Technical Assist Visits designed to standardize and certify fleet R&C check teams in safe and proper R&C check procedures.

          Electronic Attack News, published semiannually and distributed to all services, provides the electronic attack community a professional forum for frank discussion of innovative ideas, emerging technologies, joint operations and other relevant issues. The Weapons School maintains an extensive tactical library, which includes mission-planning computers and publications that provide a vital source of information for EA-6B and EA-18G aircrew and intelligence personnel.

          Seminars conducted or hosted by the Weapons School round out a full-spectrum training philosophy that reinforces the professional excellence of the command and provides the Airborne Electronic Attack community with a cadre of specialized subject matter experts supporting every tactical aspect of EA-6B and EA-18G operations. In addition to supporting locally based squadrons, the command routinely provides training for units based at Andrews AFB, MD and Japan as well as representing the electronic attack community at tactics and development conferences and seminars. As the community continues to transition to the EA-18G Growler, EAWS is publishing courseware, developing curriculum, and designing the training that will prepare the fleet and keep the community at the leading of edge of electronic warfare operations around the world.

          The dedicated staff of your Electronic Attack Weapons School reflects a command philosophy of excellence and a commitment to provide top-notch training to the world’s premier electronic attack community.