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USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT


 

 TRADITIONS 

 

 

THREE CHEERS!

Popular in Great Britain for centuries, the practice of giving three cheers ("hip, hip hooray!") was a not uncommon tribute in 19th century America. Theodore Roosevelt was so honored by his soldiers when the First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry (the "Rough Riders") was disbanded on Sep. 13, 1898, following victory in the Spanish-American War. TR was fond of proposing cheers for others whom he wanted to publicly acknowledge.

The crew of USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN 71) first gave three cheers to honor the ship's commission on Oct. 25, 1986, following a custom instituted by the first Commanding Officer, Rear Admiral P. W. Parcells. The TR traditional three cheers follow thus:

"I propose three cheers ... TWICE!"
"I propose three cheers for Theodore Roosevelt, the man. May his ideals and precepts live and guide us in this ship always."
"hip, hip ... hooray!"
"hip, hip ... hooray!"
"hip, hip ... hooray!"

"I propose three cheers for THEODORE ROOSEVELT, the ship. May she never be used in anger, but if she is, may she be ready!"
"hip, hip ... hooray!"
"hip, hip ... hooray!"
"hip, hip ... hooray!"

After assuming command in 1994, Rear Admiral R. L. Christenson changed the second cheer to, " ...may she never again be used in anger, ..." to commemorate TR's participation in Operation DESERT STORM.

RADIO CALL SIGN

When TR was commissioned, Captain P.W. Parcells requested that the TR be given "Big Stick" as her radio call sign; however, that call sign belonged to the White House and was not available. He then requested "Rough Riders" instead of "Old Soldier" which had been arbitrarily assigned by the Navy bureaucracy. He was told "Rough Rider" had already been assigned to USS LOS ANGELES (SSN 688). With that in mind, Captain Parcells armed himself with compelling logic and convinced the LOS ANGELES' Commanding Officer to swap call signs.

So it is that USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT is known throughout the fleet as "Rough Rider."